Fitness

Daily Meditation

The habit of daily meditation is one of the most powerful thing. Science has proven that the advantages of meditation are too good to ignore. In fact, completing only one 15-minute session of meditation using the Headspace app resulted in 22% reduction in mind wandering. And four weeks of using Headspace daily resulted in 14% increase in focus.

When we meditate, we can enhance our focus and decision-making and lessen our feelings of fear and stress. The result: by fundamentally shifting the way we relate to our thoughts and feelings, we can dial down the intensity of emotions that tend to take hold of us, and ultimately experience a greater sense of calm, clarity, and focus in our lives.

The particular benefits of daily generalized meditation are well-documented and widespread, ranging from reduction in anxiousness and lower blood pressure to increased immunity and better sleep. In a study that did not use the Headspace app, researchers from John Hopkins University found general mindfulness meditation programs helped ease psychological symptoms of depression, anxiety, and pain related to stress. According to another study using a generalized form of meditation, people who meditate have lower levels of cortisol, a hormone associated with physical and emotional stress. Generalized meditation has also been shown to improve sleep quality and, for those with chronic pain, increase pain tolerance.

There are lots and much of the way to meditate. But our concern isn’t to seek out an ideal sort of meditation — it’s to make the daily habit of meditation. And so our method are going to be as simple as possible.

1. Commit to just 2 minutes a day. Start simply if you would like the habit to stay . You can roll in the hay for five minutes if you are feeling good about it, but all you’re committing to is 2 minutes every day .

2. Pick a time and trigger. Not a particular time of day, but a general time, like morning once you awaken , or during your lunch hour.

3. Find a quiet spot. Sometimes early morning is best, before others in your house could be awake and making many noise. Others might find a spot during a park or on the beach or another soothing setting. It really doesn’t matter where — as long as you’ll sit without being bothered for a couple of minutes. A few people walking by your bench is ok .

4. Sit comfortably. Don’t fuss an excessive amount of about how you sit, what you wear, what you sit on, etc. I personally wish to sit on a pillow on the ground , with my back leaning against a wall, because I’m very inflexible. Others who can sit cross-legged comfortably might do this instead. Still others can sit on a chair or couch if sitting on the ground is uncomfortable. Zen practitioners often use a zafu, a round cushion crammed with kapok or buckwheat. Don’t go out and buy one if you don’t already have one. Any cushion or pillow will do, and a few people can sit on a bare floor comfortably.

5. Start with just 2 minutes. This is really important. Most people will think they will meditate for 15-30 minutes, and that they can. But this is often not a test of how strong you’re at staying in meditation — we try to make a longer-lasting habit. And to try to to that, we would like to start out with just a two minutes. You’ll find it much easier to start out this manner , and forming a habit with alittle start like this is often a way far more likely to succeed. You can expand to 5-7 minutes if you’ll roll in the hay for 7 straight days, then 10 minutes if you’ll roll in the hay for 14 straight days, then 15 minutes if you’ll stick with it for 21 straight days, and 20 if you’ll do a full month.

6. Focus on your breath. As you inhale , follow your breath in through your nostrils, then into your throat, then into your lungs and belly. Sit straight, keep your eyes open but watching the bottom and with a soft focus. If you want to close your eyes, that’s fine. As you exhale , follow your breath out back to the planet . If it helps, count … one breath in, two breath out, three breath in, four breath out … once you get to 10, start over. If you lose track, start over. If you discover your mind wandering (and you will), just concentrate to your mind wandering, then bring it gently back to your breath. Repeat this process for the jiffy you meditate. You won’t be excellent at it initially , presumably , but you’ll recover with practice.

And that’s it. It’s a really simple practice, but you would like to try to to it for two minutes, every day, after an equivalent trigger every day . Do this for a month and you’ll have a daily meditation habit.

The habit of daily meditation is one of the most powerful thing. Science has proven that the advantages of meditation are too good to ignore. In fact, completing only one 15-minute session of meditation using the Headspace app resulted in 22% reduction in mind wandering. And four weeks of using Headspace daily resulted in 14% increase in focus.

When we meditate, we can enhance our focus and decision-making and lessen our feelings of fear and stress. The result: by fundamentally shifting the way we relate to our thoughts and feelings, we can dial down the intensity of emotions that tend to take hold of us, and ultimately experience a greater sense of calm, clarity, and focus in our lives.

The particular benefits of daily generalized meditation are well-documented and widespread, ranging from reduction in anxiousness and lower blood pressure to increased immunity and better sleep. In a study that did not use the Headspace app, researchers from John Hopkins University found general mindfulness meditation programs helped ease psychological symptoms of depression, anxiety, and pain related to stress. According to another study using a generalized form of meditation, people who meditate have lower levels of cortisol, a hormone associated with physical and emotional stress. Generalized meditation has also been shown to improve sleep quality and, for those with chronic pain, increase pain tolerance.

There are lots and much of the way to meditate. But our concern isn’t to seek out an ideal sort of meditation — it’s to make the daily habit of meditation. And so our method are going to be as simple as possible.

1. Commit to just 2 minutes a day. Start simply if you would like the habit to stay . You can roll in the hay for five minutes if you are feeling good about it, but all you’re committing to is 2 minutes every day .

2. Pick a time and trigger. Not a particular time of day, but a general time, like morning once you awaken , or during your lunch hour.

3. Find a quiet spot. Sometimes early morning is best, before others in your house could be awake and making many noise. Others might find a spot during a park or on the beach or another soothing setting. It really doesn’t matter where — as long as you’ll sit without being bothered for a couple of minutes. A few people walking by your bench is ok .

4. Sit comfortably. Don’t fuss an excessive amount of about how you sit, what you wear, what you sit on, etc. I personally wish to sit on a pillow on the ground , with my back leaning against a wall, because I’m very inflexible. Others who can sit cross-legged comfortably might do this instead. Still others can sit on a chair or couch if sitting on the ground is uncomfortable. Zen practitioners often use a zafu, a round cushion crammed with kapok or buckwheat. Don’t go out and buy one if you don’t already have one. Any cushion or pillow will do, and a few people can sit on a bare floor comfortably.

5. Start with just 2 minutes. This is really important. Most people will think they will meditate for 15-30 minutes, and that they can. But this is often not a test of how strong you’re at staying in meditation — we try to make a longer-lasting habit. And to try to to that, we would like to start out with just a two minutes. You’ll find it much easier to start out this manner , and forming a habit with alittle start like this is often a way far more likely to succeed. You can expand to 5-7 minutes if you’ll roll in the hay for 7 straight days, then 10 minutes if you’ll roll in the hay for 14 straight days, then 15 minutes if you’ll stick with it for 21 straight days, and 20 if you’ll do a full month.

6. Focus on your breath. As you inhale , follow your breath in through your nostrils, then into your throat, then into your lungs and belly. Sit straight, keep your eyes open but watching the bottom and with a soft focus. If you want to close your eyes, that’s fine. As you exhale , follow your breath out back to the planet . If it helps, count … one breath in, two breath out, three breath in, four breath out … once you get to 10, start over. If you lose track, start over. If you discover your mind wandering (and you will), just concentrate to your mind wandering, then bring it gently back to your breath. Repeat this process for the jiffy you meditate. You won’t be excellent at it initially , presumably , but you’ll recover with practice.

And that’s it. It’s a really simple practice, but you would like to try to to it for two minutes, every day, after an equivalent trigger every day . Do this for a month and you’ll have a daily meditation habit.